Home > Uncategorized > The Christian Fairy Tale

The Christian Fairy Tale

Back when I was a fervent defender of “the faith” I used to be genuinely puzzled  at how otherwise seemingly intelligent people could fall for the preposterous claims of Mormonism, Scientology, Jehovah’s Witnesses and other groups Christians routinely label as “cults.”    A holy book delivered by an angel and engraved on golden tablets that nobody has ever seen?  Jesus making a post-resurrection appearance to a lost tribe of Israelites who had fled to the Americas on boat around the time of the Babylonian Exile, 587 BC?  Only 144,000 people in the top-tier of heaven?  This is blatantly crazy stuff.

And all the while I criticized cults I believed in a First Century Jewish itinerant preacher who was born of a virgin and was, in some bizarre sense, his own father.  He walked on water, fed thousands with a few fish and loaves of bread, and rose from the dead.  And if you telepathically communicate with him and consume his flesh and blood under the form of bread and wine, he will transport you to a magical kingdom at the time of your death.

It used to make all the sense in the world to me.   I wonder why it took so long to realize that there is not a single shred of objective, empirical evidence to support any of Christianity’s metaphysical claims.

In the past I used to enjoy going to “theological conferences” and hearing great theologians expound on the finer points of such pressing topics as justification and sanctification.  I now realize those meetings had all the intellectual integrity of a Star Trek convention.  Probably less, actually.

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  1. Andrew
    October 14, 2011 at 11:29 pm

    “I now realize those meetings had all the intellectual integrity of a Star Trek convention. Probably less, actually.”

    Trekkies don’t claim their hobby is based on historical events. Theologians do.

    So, yes, Trekkies have more integrity than theologians.

  2. kittybrat
    October 15, 2011 at 10:11 pm

    “I wonder why it took so long to realize that there is not a single shred of objective, empirical evidence to support any of Christianity’s metaphysical claims.”

    Yes, it sometimes takes a while, but then it just clicks and there is no going back. And good riddance to it. That type of faith is akin to living with a passive/aggressive, jealous, abusing asshole.

  3. Julia
    October 17, 2011 at 12:06 am

    Please keep writing. I’m loving this blog.Finally, finally doubt coming from someone who has been there. I’ve heard plenty of scrutiny from people who’ve been athiest or agnostic their entire lives, but never from someone who has the insight you do.

    Many years ago when I went to bible study, we did a series on other religions. Every week we basically sat and mocked the ridiculous of other religions like Mormonism, Scientology, Muslim, even Catholics. (My church was southern Baptist) I can actually remember thinking so many times, is our religions any less crazy sounding? God came to earth in the form of a human, given birth to by a virgin? The earth was flooded but an old man built an ark big enough to keep two of every animal? So did animals from other parts of the world like polar bears and wolves swim over to the middle east and hop on the boat?

    Even the plagues of Egypt, how do we know they were plagues from God and not just stuff that happened? Even today people still try to write off natural disasters as acts of God so I’m sure back then it was done even more so back then. Was it really a plague of locusts that covered the earth or was it just the 17 year cicada bugs? So many questions. So few answers. Yet a church that thumps its chest and insists they know all of the answers. Just don’t ask them any real questions and you’ll get along just fine.

  4. S
    October 17, 2011 at 2:29 am

    A larger percentage of trekkies will actually learn another language in order to participate in Klingon public service organization. They actually learn Klingon- a made up language. How many Christians learn greek or latin.

  5. Andrew
    October 21, 2011 at 12:51 pm

    “Even the plagues of Egypt, how do we know they were plagues from God and not just stuff that happened? ”

    Or, simply invented, as a small detail as part of a bigger myth? The writers of Exodus were under no obligation to “stick to the facts.” People in the ancient world simply invented narratives many times.

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