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Bible Contradiction of the Day

Here’s a quick Bible contradiction to start your Monday.  Ask your believing friends about this one,  and see what they say.   If you get any creative answers, please send them in.

The Torah strictly prohibits the ingestion of blood.   “You must not eat any blood whatever, either of bird or of animal, in any of your settlements.  Any one of you who eats any blood shall be cut off from your kin.” (Leviticus 7:26-27)  Also:  “Therefore I have said to the people of Israel: No person among you shall eat blood, nor shall any alien who resides among you eat blood.” (Leviticus 17: 12)

According to the New Testament, Jesus was an observant Jew.  And he gives no indication of having been less than kosher in his dietary habits.  Remember the time he drowned an entire herd of pigs by infecting them with a demonic spirit? (I always thought that was a bit cruel towards the poor pig farmer, who was just an innocent by-stander in the whole affair.  I’ve always wondered if Jesus ever paid him some kind of restitution for the loss of the herd.  Probably not.)

In John’s gospel, however, Jesus allegedly makes this claim about his body and blood:  “Unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood you have no life in you. Those who eat my flesh and drink my blood have eternal life, and I will raise them up on the last day; for my flesh is true food and my blood is true drink.”  (John 6: 53-55.)

Aside from the fact that this passage is just incomprehensible and bizarre,  no observant Jew would have ever encouraged blood-drinking of any sort.  It’s probably just another indication that the early Christians borrowed their notion of the Mass from similar rituals in Roman mystery cults.

 

 

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Categories: Uncategorized
  1. Jessica
    October 17, 2011 at 5:39 pm

    I’ll answer as a Christian. Jesus came to this earth to free us from the bondage of the Law. Before Jesus came, anyone who drank blood would have been seen as unclean and sinful and therefore unworthy of salvation. That’s the point. In Jesus we no longer have to worry about being unclean or sinful so long as we have faith. Requiring his followers to drink his blood further proves his point and reason for being there.

    Jesus did a lot of things that a good Jew in his day wouldn’t have done. IMO they were done intentionally to point out that we should no longer live according to those rules, but rather according to the commands that He has given us.

    And about the pigs – Jesus didn’t drown the pigs because they were unclean due to Jewish law. He drowned the pigs because they had become evil possessed after he exorcised the demons from a man. Had that exorcism not occured, I doubt Jesus would have glanced twice at the pigs.

  2. Joy
    October 17, 2011 at 9:33 pm

    If Jesus came to this earth to free us from the bondage of the Law, does that include homosexuality?

  3. Jessica
    October 18, 2011 at 12:22 am

    Joy – I’m not sure if this question is directed to me, but I’ll answer. If you are wondering if Jesus came to this earth to free us from the bondage of the Law that said homosexuals cannot be saved, then yes. Because of the cross, nothing we ever do can keep us from eternal life with God, so long as we have faith in Christ. We all sin daily and without the cross, we would all be damned. But whether we have committed adultery, divorced, lived in sin, been a homosexual, even murdered – so long as we repent and believe, we are saved.

    This doesn’t mean that Jesus approved of homosexuality (IMO), as Scripture in the NT warns against that kind of behavior. But it DOES mean that salvation is not based upon it.

  4. Andrew
    October 20, 2011 at 12:39 am

    “Jesus did a lot of things that a good Jew in his day wouldn’t have done. IMO they were done intentionally to point out that we should no longer live according to those rules, but rather according to the commands that He has given us.”

    Isn’t it a bit strange that Jews, witnessing Jesus’s miracles, didn’t turn en masse away from Judaism in the first century, then? There were early Jewish Christians, but they were very quickly overtaken and crushed by non-Jews, who then “interpreted” Jesus to glorify themselves. They invented Christian anti-Semitism in the process, putting hateful anti-Jewish words and phrases into the mouths of Jesus and his apostles that no Jew would have ever actually said.

    • Jessica
      October 20, 2011 at 7:19 pm

      “Isn’t it strange that Jews, witnessing Jesus’ miracles, didn’t turn en masse away from Judaism in the first century, then?”

      No, it’s not strange it all. Throughout history people have witnessed the miracle of God and turned their backs on It. Look at Pharaoh in Moses’ story. Plague after plague and he still denied the power of God. Then the Jews following Moses into the desert – they witnessed the plagues, watched Moses part the Red Sea, watched food literally fall from the skies and water pour from the rocks. They witnessed all of these miracles firsthand and yet they were unable to accept it and turn from their false idols. It doesn’t surprise me at all that the same thing happened with Jesus. People are scared to break away from their traditions, even when the Truth is staring them in the face.

      I would love to hear this “anti-Semitism” that you’re talking about. What words would a Jew not have said that are in the Bible and how are you privy to what a Jew at that time would and would not have done? Especially a Jew that was unhappy with what was happening and was sent to the world to save us from our “traditions”.

      • JC Denton
        October 21, 2011 at 2:53 pm

        “Look at Pharaoh in Moses’ story. Plague after plague and he still denied the power of God.”

        Yes, because God stepped in and “hardened Pharoahs’ heart” at every turn, in order to *prevent* him from accepting “the power of God”, thereby providing God with the opportunity to demonstrate his power and wrath by unleashing horrific disasters on innocent people.

        I’m surprised you seem to have missed those parts since God himself states it explicitly at least ten times throughout the text in the Book of Exodus alone.

      • JC Denton
        October 21, 2011 at 3:41 pm

        As for the “miracles” you mentioned, to say that it is hardly factual that any of them occurred is an enormous understatement. However I wonder how many people realize that even the overall stories surrounding these miracle stories (the enslavement of the Israelites, their escape from Egypt, their 40-year journey to Israel, the conquests of Canaan) are also completely unsupported or even directly contradicted by the historical and archaeological evidence, and show all the signs of being purely almost entirely mythological fabrications.

        The PBS/Nova documentary “The Bible’s Buried Secrets” is a good place to start regarding these issues and represents the general consensus of Biblical scholarship. The whole documentary is available on YouTube in 13 parts:

  5. October 21, 2011 at 3:51 pm

    Yes, JC, the consensus among archaeologists is that the Exodus event never happened and there was never a mass, long-term enslavement of the Hebrews in Egypt. And of course that would make any discussion of the alleged miracles a moot point.

    I actually think we have the film “The Ten Commandments” to blame for the fixation on Moses’ battle with Pharaoh. Great film! But horrible history.

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