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Posts Tagged ‘belief’

Benign Belief?

July 10, 2012 5 comments

A few months ago when I had the chance to appear on MSNBC’s “Up W/ Chris Hayes” author Robert Wright asked me if I felt a sense of urgency about recruiting others to the free-thought position.   Or is it enough be satisfied with one’s own skepticism and adopt a “live and let live” attitude toward belief?   Is it rude and intolerant to challenge the beliefs of others?   I didn’t have a great answer at the time he posed the question, but I’ve been thinking about it a lot since.

From time to time I’ve heard this position expressed:  “I don’t care what you believe, as long as you don’t impose your religion on me.”  Personally I sometimes resonate with that attitude.  Tolerance is often in short supply in our world.  It sounds nice to say that belief is purely a private matter, but I’m not sure that is even true.   Every single day the news brings us examples of how belief negatively impacts our world.  Here are just a few examples:

  • Surveys consistently show that people of faith are far more likely to deny the reality of global warming and its anthropogenesis.  There is often a connection between religiosity and a hostility to science.
  • In my home state of Texas, the religious views of the state Board of Education force publishers to alter the content of textbooks, which are then sold throughout the rest of the country.
  • A few weeks ago the Southern Baptist Convention vigorously reconfirmed their position that gay rights are not civil rights.  On so many issues of social justice theology has acted as a brake on progress.
  • Still every day around the the world people kill other people over theologies, beliefs, myths and other unprovable ideas.  A super-intelligent alien race studying humanity would surely conclude that we are an insane species.

And of course this is just the tip of the iceberg. I often wonder if belief impacts just about everything in our society.  For instance, does belief in a punishing God contribute to a generally pervasive punitive approach to life,  as exemplified in our draconian “war on drugs?”

So, I guess I’m leaning toward the position that there is no such thing as benign belief.   It ultimately disables critical reasoning.

On the other hand,  I also think that skeptics and freethinkers can at times shut down conversation as well.  The best way forward would be through conversation not confrontation, to be challenging but also charitable.

As always,  I’d love to hear your thoughts.

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Why Belief Persists

June 22, 2012 5 comments

Question from a reader:  “Surely people have doubted their religions for centuries, yet all of the major religions have continued to grow and thrive.  Perhaps it is our more recent understanding of science that has helped fuel the growth of religious dissent.   How is it that we can still have so many people DEEPLY devoted to religion in the face of all we know?

Well, the short answer to the last question is that old habits die hard. And religion is a very old habit–a habit which evolved tens of thousands of years ago while the human brain was still developing.   The human brain tends to naturally believe in gods because in our prehistoric past belief in the tribal myths conferred various survival advantages.

On one level, humans have a natural tendency to over-infer agency;  we are predisposed to see threats to our existence everywhere.   We tend to assume the worst–that the stick shaped like a snake is, in fact, a snake.   A noise in the underbrush could be a predator.   Natural selection of course would favor individuals who successfully avoided predators.  And that’s a big reason why humans today still see agency everywhere, even where it’s not.   The old Christian hymn “This is My Father’s World”  expresses this primitive impulse:  “In the rustling grass I hear Him pass; He speaks to me everywhere.”

Ancient hunter-gatherer tribes also discovered that devotion to the  gods was an effective tool for tribal cohesion.   The threats and rewards of religion motivated people to sacrifice and even die for the tribe.   In the prehistoric world of almost constant inter-tribal conflict, the tribe with the strongest religion would survive and the genetic algorithm for religiosity would proliferate.   It’s a little bit of an over-simplification, but not much.

So why do people still believe?   Because belief is in our DNA.  Science, however, having emerged long after the human brain evolved does not come naturally to us.

In your question you said that all the major religions have continued to grow and thrive.   Actually that seems to be changing fairly quickly.  In the parts of the world with access to better education, religion is stagnating or declining.  There are very few believing Christians left in Western Europe.  Religious Buddhism (as opposed to the non-theistic philosophy) hit a wall in Japan a long time ago.  And this week the Southern Baptist Convention reported a loss of members for the fifth year in a row, which is astonishing for this powerhouse evangelical denomination.  I think it’s a pretty clear indication of where the culture is going.